Tag Archives: Women

A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry

a raisin in the sun by lorraine hansberryTitle: A Raisin in the Sun
Author: Lorraine Hansberry
Publisher: Modern Library
ISBN: 978-0679601722
Genre: Drama, American Literature, Black Literature
Pages: 176
Source: Personal Copy
Rating: 5 stars

Let me start this short review with this: Anyone who goes on and on and on about James Baldwin, which isn’t a bad thing at all by the way, should and must read Lorraine Hansberry. Amongst other things, Hansberry was the first black woman author whose play was performed on Broadway. It doesn’t seem much, but it is so much more, given the human rights they were fighting for – constantly, and still are.

Lorraine Hansberry did not write much. I wish she had. Her bibliography is limited. But, whatever she wrote is pure gold and deserves to be placed on the highest literary shelf there is. Her biography Looking for Lorraine by Imani Perry, which is a must-read if you’d like to know more about her. Well, let’s get on with A Raisin in the Sun.

What’s strange is that I had had the book on my shelf for years now but never picked it up. It is almost like you only read books when they are ready to be read and not before nor after. The timing has to be right and I am so glad that it was time for this play. This play is everything you think it is and more. A black family’s dreams and aspiration is portrayed heartbreakingly in this cracker of a play. The Younger family has decided to make something of themselves. While Ruth is content with what they have, her husband Walter isn’t. He wants to give a better life to their son, Travis. They live in poverty with Walter’s mother Lena and his sister Beneatha in a dilapidated two-bedroom apartment on Chicago’s south side. All Walter wants is a move, to some place better.

The entire play is about their trials and tribulations. And while Hansberry covers that brilliantly, she layers it with everything racist, everything prejudiced, and biased. There have been about three films based on this play, each better than the other and of course you must watch them when you can. Hansberry’s writing is without any apologies. It is as it is. Most of the play was semi-autobiographical and perhaps that’s why its candidness and brutal honesty challenged President Kennedy to take bolder stances on the Civil Rights Movement.

A Raisin in the Sun can rightly be called a movement. A revolution even – a small one and in its own way, a very important one. It was and continues to remain just that. A movement that will continue as long as disparity and inequality exists. Once you are done reading this extremely powerful play, read more by Hansberry. Be prepared to be in awe. Over and over again.

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Missing, Presumed Dead by Kiran Manral

Missing, Presumed Dead

Title: Missing, Presumed Dead
Author: Kiran Manral
Publisher: Amaryllis
ISBN: 978-9387383685
Genre: Crime, Thriller, Mystery/Family
Pages: 268
Source: Author
Rating: 4 Stars

I do not read thrillers. I normally stay away from them. From most of them at least. But, “Missing, Presumed Dead” is not just another thriller or not just a thriller at all for that matter. It is so much more and thank god for that! I read one of Kiran’s books before picking up this one and thoroughly enjoyed it. That one was eerie, with some suspense and kept me on the edge. This one on the other hand is more contemplative, it has its elements of thrill but what pulled me toward it was the language (simple and effective), characterisation and pacing. At no point did I feel the book go flat or not living up to my expectations.

As the synopsis will tell you, “Missing, Presumed Dead” is a story of a dysfunctional marriage, about half-sisters Aisha and Heer, and Aisha’s husband Prithvi with his own agenda (or so it seems). What the synopsis doesn’t tell you is how the story is beautifully woven and that too set on the outskirts of a town in the hills of North India. Manral creates magic where scene is concerned. And it is as though her characters and the story just blends right in, effortlessly – it inches from page to page and as a reader, you are sucked into her world.

Every scene, every dialogue between characters or for that matter even what they are thinking is clear, inviting and makes you want to know more. What happened to Aisha? What happened to Heer right after? Why is Prithvi the way he is? And the children at the centre of all this drama. What I admired the most about the book is that Kiran does not dumb it down for the readers, nor does she play safe. She enters a territory that is dangerous, dark and in my opinion not many Indian writers have managed to explore mental health the way she has in this book.

At the same time, the story is completely readable and racy (for lack of a better word, my apologies). Manral explores a different genre, gets out of her comfort zone and manages to do all of this with a lot of substance in plot and the narrative. “Missing, Presumed Dead” is the kind of book that you’d want to finish in a day (that’s exactly what I did). So keep a day ready for it.

 

So Lucky by Nicola Griffith

So LuckyTitle: So Lucky
Author: Nicola Griffith
Publisher: MCD x FSG Originals
ISBN: 978-0374265922
Genre: Literary Fiction, LGBTQIA
Pages: 192
Source: Publisher
Rating: 4 Stars

I had read “Hild” a couple of years ago and loved it. So I was more than happy to read and review this one when it came to me. I was astounded by the writing. Still am. “So Lucky” is almost everything rolled into one concise book – it is literary fiction, a thriller,    a medical thriller at that, political in nature, an LGBTQIA read, and also autobiographical in nature to a very large extent. Nicola Griffith has put it all in and doesn’t lack a punch. It is there in almost every page of the book.

“So Lucky” is about Mara Tagarelli – the head of a multi-million dollar AIDS Foundation is also a committed martial artist. And suddenly, just one fine day she is diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and doesn’t know how to deal with it, till she does. She just wants to break the pattern of being treated like a victim – even though her body is weighing her down.  There is then the question of social media bullying (which is fascinating in its own way when you get to it). There is also the element of community and what becomes of friends and family when it actually comes down to being there.

It is an angry book, a book of hope and a book of love as well. There is a lot going on that will leave you bereft and raw, however, it is told with intelligence and much honesty. The book bites and stings and also hurts where it must. It doesn’t go gently all the way. I loved that the most about this book. After a very long time, I have read something that is so refreshingly candid and makes no bones about telling things the way they are.

She Persisted Around the World: 13 Women Who Changed History by Chelsea Clinton and Alexandra Boiger.

She Persisted Around the World Title: She Persisted Around the World: 13 Women Who Changed History
Author: Chelsea Clinton
Illustrated by Alexandra Boiger
Publisher: Philomel Books
ISBN: 978-0525516996
Genre: Children Non-Fiction
Pages: 32
Source: Publisher
Rating: 4 Stars

We need more books such as these. We need books to empower our children – more so girls – they need to know that nothing is impossible and not achievable. There is no such thing as a “man’s world”. And even if there is, it shouldn’t exist because time’s up.

I wasn’t aware that Chelsea Clinton had written books. I got to know of this book by chance and though it is for children, I think it is meant for all. Men and women alike and for people in general, more so for men if you ask me. Chelsea speaks of life of 13 very independent, strong and brave women in various fields, around the world and how they impacted the world. This is a book that is just one of those starts that make children see the world differently. I would so want every mother to gift this to her son, just so he understands and sees the world differently – without privilege of being a son to begin with.

“She Persisted: Around the World” is a book that is deceitfully simple and carries so much gravitas in it. I thoroughly enjoyed this read, though of course it ended very soon. The illustrations by Alexandra Boiger are quaint and simple – striking and full of colour and complement the words superbly. Books such as these are baby steps – steps that might eventually pave way for all the leaps and jumps.

 

 

Sparrow by Sarah Moon

Sparrow by Sarah Moon Title: Sparrow
Author: Sarah Moon
Publisher:  Scholastic
ISBN: 978-1338032581
Genre: Young Adult
Pages: 272
Source: Publisher
Rating: 4 Stars

As an introvert, Sparrow’s life has not been easy. She has been prone to reading and being by herself, which isn’t a bad thing at all. She prefers watching birds, and spending time with her high-flying mother, who is an IT executive at a Brooklyn bank. She has no friends and her world is limited to books and her teacher, Mrs. Wexler, the school librarian. She is the perfect friend Sparrow has – she doesn’t speak much and knows exactly what book Sparrow will like next. Till tragedy takes place and Mrs. Wexler dies in a freak accident. From then on, Sparrow is left all alone – miserable and lonely, almost wanting to commit suicide. Sparrow enters therapy and her world changes like never before. Enter: Rock & Roll music.

This is the plot of “Sparrow” by Sarah Moon. Sarah knows how to decode a teenager’s head. What goes on in Sparrow’s mind is almost bang-on. In fact, many a time I was transported to my teenage years and that had me nodding in affirmation to everything that was going on in the book. Moon’s prose is bang-on in so many parts, especially when she describes Sparrow with a book or her new-found love and the solace Rock & Roll brings to her life.

The book touches on mental health issues delicately and I wish it had probed a little further on it, though it is there and does address it in more than one way. The story doesn’t stray and I enjoyed Sparrow’s transition from grieving to loss to contemplating suicide to seeing things and life for what they were. Sarah Moon doesn’t glorify anything. If anything, she tells a story the way it is meant to be told – in an honest way. Just for that “Sparrow” deserves one read at least. Also, because it is rather warm in a lot of places.