Tag Archives: Sidin Vadukut

Bombay Fever by Sidin Vadukut

51FWR4u6XwL._SX309_BO1,204,203,200_-2 Title: Bombay Fever
Author: Sidin Vadukut
Publisher: Simon and Schuster India
ISBN: 978-8193355282
Genre: Thriller, Mystery, Horror
Pages: 368
Source: Publisher
Rating: 4 Stars

What are the elements of a good thriller? Pace, pace and more pace is what I would answer if someone asked me such a question. Also, the plot matters and that goes without saying. I like thrillers to be simple and not so complicated. Off-late, every thriller I picked up has had the element of too much happening in it, which kind of ruins the book for me. I like a story to be direct, perhaps even one-dimensional when it comes to this genre and not too complex that I don’t understand what’s going on after a point. It shouldn’t become the Interstellar of novels.

So when a copy of “Bombay Fever” by Sidin Vadukut found its way to be for review, I was a little skeptical to read it. I do not enjoy medical thrillers. I have read a couple of Robin Cooks as we all do when in college but that’s about it. Till I started reading this one and was completely taken in by it. The book starts in Switzerland and in the courtyard of a Hindu temple – a woman collapses in the arms of a visiting Indian journalist, and her body is nothing but blood. The same then continues to happen all over Mumbai – men, women, children, the young and the old die in the same way and no one knows why. It is a deadly disease but that’s all is known about it. What will happen next? Will the city be saved? Will the world be saved? Sidin makes you dig further and also smartly leaves clues all over the place as you turn the pages.

Vadukut’s writing till now has only been in the genre of humor and sarcasm, so maybe that is why I was skeptical to even read this one. Having said that, this book isn’t like any other thriller. I loved the research done by Sidin for this one – there is a lot of medical and historical trivia of the last century which was so essential to the plot. The writing is crisp and doesn’t amble now. The chapters are short (Thank God for small mercies) which is what is most needed when a thriller is being written or according to me one gets bored, if the chapters are too long. Also, what I loved about the book is that the writing is simple. Even the technical terms usage doesn’t impact the writing. Might I add, there is also some humor in the book which is much needed given the seriousness and tension that the book is layered with.

“Bombay Fever” hits the right spots at the right time. It makes you want to turn the pages and the plot twists and characters are all very plausible. At the same time, it is very scary to note that something like that could actually happen. An epidemic is only a reality that Sidin writes of, instilling that strange fear in you at 2 am in the morning as you turn the page.

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Book Review: The Popcorn Essayists: What movies do to writers: Edited by Jai Arjun Singh

Title: The Popcorn Essayists: What Movies do to Writers
Editor: Jai Arjun Singh
Publisher: Tranquebar Press
ISBN: 9789380658353
PP: 227 Pages
Price: Rs. 395
Genre: Non-Fiction
Source: Publisher
Rating: 4/5

Thirteen different genre writing and thinking writers all come together to contribute to this collection of essays – as the title suggests, about movies. If you are a film aficionado and also love reading about movies, then this book is sure meant for you. The Popcorn Essayists is a compilation of 13 essays centred around films, the way they are made and how they are perceived by the audience – in this case the writers.

The contributing writers include Manjula Padmanabhan, Manil Suri, Kamila Shamssie, Anjum Hasan, Amitava Kumar, Namita Gokhale, Jai Arjun Singh (the editor of this collection), Musharraf Ali Farooqi, Madhulika Liddle, Sidin Vadukut, Rajoshri Chakraborti, Sumana Roy and Jaishree Misra. The reason I have mentioned all names is for you to understand the variety that this book provides and the themes it touches – from Art House Cinema (as it was termed in the days gone by) to a day in the life of a writer as a Helen Cabaret Dancer to a writer’s experience about watching Satya, this book has it all.

What I loved about the book while reading it was that I immediately wanted to see all the movies recommended by the writers, even if I had seen some of them some time ago, I still wanted a re-viewing and only to understand the essays better.  When a group of writers come together to contribute to any collection, it is so important to see that the ideas merge and the flow is consistent, and it is with this precision that the editor delivers on this book. The writing is crisp and sharp and to the point, without forcing any opinions down the readers’ throat. At some point though some essays do get technical, but I guess that could not have been avoided, considering the topic.

Movies are magic and we are all aware of that fact. The book attempts I think to introduce us to different genres of movies, like I said without sounding condescending or patronizing. It is about the nuances that are noticed while watching a loud Punjabi Masala Movie or at the same time about the experiences of another author while viewing the works of Finland’s Kaurismäki Brothers and their impact and contribution to world cinema.

All in all, The Popcorn Essayists is a book that must be read for the love of cinema or for the joy of reading and in the process, discovering some great cinema.

You can buy the book here on Flipkart