Tag Archives: Readers

Book Love by Debbie Tung

booklovebydebbietung Title: Book Love
Author: Debbie Tung
Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing
ISBN: 978-1449494285
Genre: Comics, Humour
Pages: 144
Source: Publisher
Rating: 5 stars

What better moment for readers than to see themselves in a book? To relate to it so hard and strong that with every turn of the page, you know every situation because you have been in that or multiple situations more than once.

Book Love by Debbie Tung is that kind of a book. It is a book about loving books (as evident by the title), but more than that it is about readers and how we function around books and our relationship to them. Book Love is the much-needed warm blanket on a winter’s night. It is the cup of tea that hits the right notes and lingers long after you’ve drunk it.

booklove1

Being a book lover, I just didn’t want the book to finish. It is a book of comic strips depicting our collective love of books and reading. This transcends everything – colour, race, skin, creed, caste – just about it all. Because when it comes to reading, you and I, and all of us, are the same people. We are the tribe of readers and Tung has a way of putting that beautifully through her comics. The words and images combine to present a beautiful gift to the reader. I know I am getting all sappy, but hey this is a book about books and I shall get this way.

booklove2Debbie Tung’s concept is not new, but the execution is brilliant and well-done. The book captures it all: book lovers in bookshops, in libraries, in their favourite reading spots, how readers feel when a good book ends, and how we pack for a vacation. With every turn of the page, all I did was nod my head in agreement, because there was nothing else to do. Most readers are guilty of what Tung expresses and only more happy for that.

booklove4

Tung knows how readers are and that can only come to you if you are a reader and feel the same. Tung’s illustrations always manage to hit home and that’s the beauty of a book such as this one. Where essays could be written about every situation (and that is also quite delightful to read), simple drawings depicting who readers are does the trick and more. Book Love makes you want to reach out to your favourite books and hug them for being a part of your life. A must-read for all lovers of books and reading, and also for ones who are just starting out.

Interview with Anand Neelkantan

Here’s an in-depth interview with the author of Asura, Ajaya and the soon to release the sequel to Ajaya, called Rise of Kali.

Ajaya Cover

1. What does AJAY signify in the title of the book?

Ajaya means unconquearable. The Kauravas were never conquered, they were decimated to the last man. Ajaya is also a play of words to show what is not Jaya, the original name of Mahabharata. Though Ajaya does not mean what is not Jaya, it is to imply that this is Mahabharata from the other side

2. After all your writing and research, what is your final opinion on Duryodhana as a man and a leader?

Suyodhana was a man far ahead of times. He had his flaws, he trusted his friends too much and took unneccessary risks, was more sincere to Karna than Karna was to him and was passionate to the core. He believed in certain ideals, was sometimes naive and sometimes arrogant, but he never tried to justify his deed behind the cloak of dharma. He was a rebel, far ahead of his times and he paid the price.

3. Did the Kurukshetra war have any winners? What did it achieve? Can it be justified?

I think sage Vyasa gave the named his epic, “Jaya” to bring out the irony. There were no winners for the war. If the war was the victory of good for evil, after the war the evil age should not have started. This reasoning that it was fought for restoration of dharma fails, when we see that it is the age of Adharma that had risen after the war. So what was the purpose of war, as Balarama asks?

4. Was Draupadi perhaps the greatest victim in the Mahabharata?

Draupadi, like many other women and children, was also a victim of the war. All the women of Mahabharata are victims, trampled by a masculine world. Gandhari who lost all her sons, Kunti who lost all her grandsons and a son, Draupadi who lost all her sons, the Nishada woman who lost her life and all her sons, Hidumbi who lost her son, Uthara who lost her husband, Bhanumathi who lost both her husband and son- the list is endless. There is no justification in singling out Draupadi.

5. How do you explain Gandhari’s 100 sons and 1 daughter?

The ratio is perplexing. The entire Kuru race has 106 sons (including the Yuyutsu, the Vysya son of Dhritarashtra) and 1 daughter and may be Lakshmana is the only another woman in the household. Or may be all the 100s are not sons of Gandhari, but perhaps sons of Dhritarashtra (there are many other sons mentioned in some texts) and the daughters are not mentiones with the same importance as Dushala (Sushala) since they are not from the Royal womb of Gandhari. We do not know and we can only speculate. As I said, it was a man’s world, not much different from now, where only lip service is given to the divinity of women.

Anand 1

6. Did any Kaurava survive the war?

Dhritarashtra, the real Kaurava was the ultimate victor

7. Do you feel a sense of catharsis having finished the book?

Writing any book is hard work, it is doubly so when the subject is the most complicated and biggest epic in the world

Rise of Kali

8. What are you working on now?

I am working as an episodic story writer for Star TV’s upcoming serial Siya ke Ram. I am working on a fantasy thriller based on Mythology, tentatively titled Devayani. I have also signed up for a Hindi/Telugu bilingual and discussions are on for Asura to be made as Hindi/Tamil/Telugu trilingual film

9.What do you think made Leadstart take your book when other Publishers had not?

Leadstart took the book when not many were willing to publish mythology books. They saw the potential in Asura when others did not. Asura was an unusual book in the sense that it went against the conventional way of writing mythology. It is a disturbing book, not offensive, but something that would challenge the long held belief and give voice to the sceptic inside the reader. Not many publishers would take that risk.

10. How did you think of this concept? What got you inspired?

This was something that I have grown up with and I write about things that disturbs me most. The other side, hidden in the shadows, is always exciting to explore.

11. What do you think about writing as a profession in India?

Writing as a profession is yet to come of age in India. Except a few authors who have made it really big, it is difficult to earn a living out of writing. Despite spectacular success of Asura and Ajaya, I am yet to resign my job. There are many like me with a string of best sellers who still work for a living or are businessmen. Except Chetan Bhagat, Amish or one or two others, if we take the top 10 writers of the country, most of us are either businessmen or employees. There is a long way to go for us to see Indian writers owning private jets and mansions like what they do in the west. But apart from money, writing gives a lot of satisfaction which no other profession can. Writing in India, can be a rewarding hobby, at best and not a profession.

12. Any message you would want to give to your readers?

Read the book with an open mind. Read good books not to get answers but to simulate more questions in your mind

Looking forward to Rise of Kali! I am sure it will be a great read.

Interview Courtesy: Booksense

You can follow Booksense on Twitter @Booksensed

Book Review: The Night Bookmobile by Audrey Niffenegger

Title: The Night Bookmobile
Author: Audrey Niffenegger
Publisher:  Jonathan Cape, London
PP: 64
Genre: Graphic Novel
ISBN:  9780224089524
Price: £16.99
Source: Personal Copy
Rating: 5/5

I am mesmerized by anything that is written about books or on the love of reading. It makes you connect in ways, as a reader that only other readers will understand and the bond will be instant. Of books and reading, of discussing authors – known and unknown, of living immersed in words – whether physical or on your e-readers, the bottom line is : Readers connect anywhere in the world and that is how it must be.

For a very long time, I have wanted to read this graphic novel only because this would have been my first by Audrey Niffenegger. I haven’t read any of her novels and I thought this would be the best place to start.            

So, “The Night Bookmobile” is as the title suggests about a Night Bookmobile Library that is open from dusk till dawn and that’s that. It is run by a certain Robert Openshaw – the librarian, and in it one fine early morning – 3am to be precise walks in Alexandra, after a fight with her boyfriend only to discover books she has read all through the years, stacked in the mysterious mobile library. Years pass and she comes across the mobile library only when it wants to show itself to her. She reads with every year passing and those books keep adding to the library. How? That is another part of the story. Alexandra wants to work for the library, however cannot. Why? Well to know that, you would to have to read this gem of a graphic novel about books for lovers of books.

What I loved about this book? The fact that it was so wistfully written – as if in a dream state and maybe it was. The illustrations are fantastic as well. As I read this graphic novel (hate to use the term, however there is no other way to describe the genre) I had this perpetual smile across my face, as the hungry reader, could relate to what was taking place. The want and need to be surrounded by books at all times seemed so satisfying that maybe had I been in the protagonist’s place, I would have given it all up, to be with books and read them endlessly.

One might think that there would be nothing to quote from a graphic novel at that, however here is one for you:

“Have you ever found your heart’s desire and then lost it? I had seen myself, a portrait of myself as a reader. My childhood: hours spent in airless classrooms, days home sick from school reading Nancy Drew, forbidden books secretively late at night. Teenage years reading – trying to read – books I’d heard were important, Naked Lunch and The Fountainhead, Ulysses, and Women in Love…It was as though I had dreamt the perfect lover, who vanished as I woke, leaving me pining and surly. “

All I can say is that: If you are a reader and haven’t read this one, then maybe you aren’t a reader.