Tag Archives: random house

Plumdog by Emma Chichester Clark

Plumdog by Emma Chichester Clark Title: Plumdog
Author: Emma Chichester Clark
Publisher: Jonathan Cape
ISBN: 978-0224098403
Genre: Graphic Novel
Pages: 160
Source: Personal Copy
Rating: 5/5

If you haven’t had a dog, or had a dog or still have a dog or in general love dogs, then “Plumdog” is the book for you. “Plumdog” happened to me on a Sunday at Wayword and Wise as I was browsing their shelves and chanced upon this little gem.

Plumdog - Image 1

I wasn’t aware then that Emma had a blog about her dog Plum that she updated quite regularly if not daily, neither was I aware that it was about the daily ongoing of life as seen through her dog Plum. And might I add that this book is a graphic novel, which is beautifully illustrated by Emma and that’s why it is even more special.


Now you know what “Plumdog” is about. I have said what I had to in the earlier paragraph. Having said that, why should you read this book? I will not even get there, because honestly, I believe that everyone should read it. Animals are way more precious than human beings and more importantly dogs. They love with no conditions. They give selflessly. Their loyalty is fierce and they know how to be there for you. Plum loves playing catching the twig, diving into rivers, treats (but of course) and spending time on her parents’ bed and of course also being all snooty when approached by the boys.

Plumdog - Image 3

“Plumdog” is all of that rolled into one about how dogs are and what they might think, which is a treat (I said that already but I cannot help but gush over it). Plumdog is a gift to be given to all who you know who love dogs and also who love pets in general. It will warm your soul and heart like no other book.

And add to that, it is also a blog on: http://www.emmachichesterclark.co.uk/blog.php Read it.

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Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books by Azar Nafisi

Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi Title: Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books
Author: Azar Nafisi
Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks
ISBN: 978-0812979305
Genre: Non-Fiction, Literature
Pages: 400
Source: Personal Copy
Rating: 5/5

I had wanted to read this book since a very long time. In fact, at one point I even read it till about hundred pages and then just gave it up. Perhaps the time was not right. There are books that need to be read only when you are ready for them and at that time I wasn’t. “Reading Lolita in Tehran” came back to me around a while ago. I had to pick up another copy and start afresh and I did. I now completely see that I was right for it at this time than earlier.

“Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books” is about Azar Nafisi and the classes she taught in her home in Tehran once she quit the university of Tehran. It is not only about this though. It is not about the books they read because they could not read them freely and talk about them. The book goes deeper than that – it is about the Islamic revolution in Iran and how that impacted the lives of women when the Ayatollah came to power.

The author, now living in the US speaks of two decades in Iran as a teacher of American and English literature and how Iran changed drastically after the fall of the Shah. The transformation of Iran is charted through the eyes of the women who come to her house and they learn literature and compare their lives to it, thereby raising pertinent questions. For me this book was an eye-opener of what goes on outside my comfort zone and how in the long run it will impact all of us, whether we see it coming or not.

The insights from the books and parallel to lives are stupendously reached at and just for that I would so strongly recommend this book. The language is simple and yet at times it gets political but that is also because the book is about that and how art imitates life and vice-versa. It is about the relationships she has as a teacher with her students and also as a friend and extending it beyond to knowing who they truly are. All of this happens because of books.

Nafisi’s world is both real and fictitious and with her, so are her students’ lives. You get a glimpse and more about each story and how books shape them at the end of it all. The book is about fiction’s strength to empathize and deal with daily situations, more so when you live in a society that refuses to grant you your rights and there are restrictions at every step.

“Reading Lolita in Tehran” invites all readers to see life differently and to relate them to what you read and how it impacts you on a daily basis. I could not stop reading this one and I regret waiting this long to read it but all said and done it is a book which is not to be missed out on. Better late than never, right?

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Reading Lolita in Tehran


Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books

Y – The Last Man – Volume 1: Unmanned by Brian K Vaughan and Art by Pia Guerra

Y - The Last Man - Volume 1 - Unmanned by Brian K. Vaughan Title: Y: The Last Man, Vol. 1: Unmanned
Author: Brian K. Vaughan
Illustrator: Pia Guerra
Publisher: Vertigo Comics
ISBN: 978-1563899805
Genre: Comics, Graphic Novels
Pages: 128
Source: Personal Copy
Rating: 5/5

Yorrick Brown is the only human survivor of a planet-wide plague that instantly kills every mammal possessing a Y chromosome. He does not know why and his entire world goes for a toss in this mysterious circumstance.

Interesting isn’t it? That’s what I thought as well and loved the premise. When I picked up the book and got done with the first volume, I loved it even more. The story is unique and begs to be a television series.

Image 1

The illustrations by Pia Guerra are sharp and display the post-apocalyptic world (well almost) quite interestingly. Yorrick then begins his journey with his pet monkey, a young geneticist and a government agent to go find his girlfriend halfway across the world and to figure how he happened to be the last man on earth.

Just for the premise, I would say you have to read this comic series. Brian K. Vaughan does an amazing job of this and this is before Saga was worked on. It is only a collection of ten volumes, so it does end somewhere. The narrative is so fast that there were times I had to go back and forth, just to make sense of it all. All that I can say is that the series will not disappoint me and yes I say this without having read the other volumes. I did pick up two, three and four right after. Go on and read this one.

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Y: The Last Man VOL 01: Unmanned

Camera Lucida by Roland Barthes Title: Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography
Author: Roland Barthes
Publisher: Vintage, Random House
ISBN: 978-0099225416
Genre: Photography, Art, Non-Fiction
Pages: 144
Source: Personal Copy
Rating: 5/5

I was never interested in photography. Somehow, it just did not interest me. However, after reading “On Photography” by Susan Sontag and also “Ways of Seeing” by John Berger, I started taking some interest in the subject and I had known of Roland Barthes. Coupled with this was the fact that he had written on photography, so it was just only a matter of time before I would read it.

What the Photograph reproduces to infinity has occurred only once: the Photograph mechanically repeats what could never be repeated existentially.

“Camera Lucida” is about photos, life, and death and about the cultures we inhabit. The book is not just about photographs and photography. It is a lot more on actually how we see and how we are conditioned to see.

“The photograph is literally an emanation of the referent. From a real body, which was there, proceed radiations which ultimately touch me, who am here; the duration of the transmission is insignificant; the photograph of the missing being, as Sontag says, will touch me like the delayed rays of a star.”

The book is all about art – about how paintings came to lose some significance with the invention of the camera and how that was not the case after a couple of years. “Camera Lucida” is a collection of essays on “the photograph by onlooker” than what a photographer may think of his or her photograph. He questions what it means to take pictures and what the probable outcomes of it are.

It is not an easy read, but it is highly satisfying. Barthes draws on examples from life, what surrounds us and how it feels like to have a relationship with a still image in an age of constant movement and newer digital means.

“Camera Lucida” is about interpretation, imagination and art. It is more so about living and what it takes to make sense of art that is all-pervasive. The book is short and just right to know more about photography and the medium that it is. I will of course go back to it at some point. I must also say that it is not a read that you can fly by, however once you sink your teeth in it, it is an excellent read.

Reading the World: Confessions of a Literary Explorer by Ann Morgan

Reading the World by Ann Morgan Title: Reading the World: Confessions of a Literary Explorer
Author: Ann Morgan
Publisher: Harvill Secker
ISBN: 9781846557873
Genre: Non-Fiction, Memoirs
Pages: 336
Source: Publisher
Rating: 5/5

It was about a year ago, when I was led to a site where I discovered a lady who was reading a book from every country. It was her reading project for the year and I was most intrigued by the concept. I then knew that I had to read the book of how it all began when it came out.

“Reading the World” by Ann Morgan is literally about a woman’s journey across the world through books from each country. It is obviously not as simple as this. There is more to the entire process and revelation which this book is all about.
I am a big fan of books about books and that also blends in cultures of various places, which Morgan manages to do beautifully in this book. I agree that initially I did have a problem getting into it, given the tone and structure, but once you do, it is an effortless read (at least for some I am sure).

If you are expecting reviews of every book she read, then you should check out her site, ayearofreadingtheworld.com and not the book, because the book is not about that. The book is about Morgan’s experiences to get to the project and how people all over the world contributed to it. “Reading the World” is about how she chose the books for the project, the things she learned about literature and the experiences that made her question everything.

Books about books and the experience of reading just goes to show that there is so much hope for the world. I say that because I genuinely believe in the redemptive power of books and each book that Morgan picked up led her to questioning, working it all over again and reading books which she otherwise would not have. I urge all book lovers to get hold of this one and read it. It will make you more mindful of the literature that exists in the world, which is not ridden only by American or British literature, but a whole lot more.

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Reading the World: Confessions of a Literary Explorer

Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott

Bird by Bird Title: Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life
Author: Anne Lamott
Publisher: Anchor, Vintage, Random House
ISBN: 9780385480017
Genre: Non-Fiction
Pages: 272
Source: Personal Copy
Rating: 4/5

I had wanted to read “Bird by Bird” by Anne Lamott since a while now. I think the very nature of the book appealed to me. Thoughts on writing and life seemed quite interesting and insightful. Anne Lamott’s writing style coupled with it, only makes the book more interesting and worth the read.

“Bird by Bird” is not just about writing. There are life lessons in this one which like I said make the book better. Lamott’s writing is not inclined to making this a “how-to” book. It is not that, nor does it intend to be that. It is also not a self-help manual. At the same time, this book is not specifically for writers. It can be read by anyone who wants to write and does. This is for some of us who are struggling with writing and at the same time are embroiled in following rigid rules, which Lamott is completely against.

She makes writing seem very simple and of course admits to it being hard work. Writing to Lamott is about facing truths, growing up with your drafts, about revelations and most of all it is about determination – the idea to not give up and keep at it, page after page.

“Bird by Bird” is all about bettering oneself at writing and gradually at life. Her personal stories are out there and as a reader I was in awe of her writing skills and the life she leads. This is the kind of book that does not restrict itself to a certain audience. Lamott makes you see things and urges you to experience life, your characters, the plot you have devised and see it through. I strongly recommend “Bird by Bird” for any upcoming writer and also for an established writer who wants to work on his or her craft.

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Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life

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The Three Incestuous Sisters by Audrey Niffenegger

The Three Incestuous Sisters  by Audrey Niffenegger Title: The Three Incestuous Sisters
Author: Audrey Niffenegger
Publisher: Jonathan Cape
ISBN: 9780224076869
Genre: Graphic Novel
Pages: 176
Source: Personal Copy
Rating: 5/5

This one is a strange book. And at the heart of it, not so strange after all. It is all about envy, longing, and gorgeously illustrated. Though the book can be read almost immediately and maybe within fifteen minutes, you still will pore and ponder over it. The book has a very Goth appeal to it (which I personally loved) and it somehow just adds to the atmosphere and no better time to read this book than Winter.

The Three Incestuous Sisters - 1

The book as the title suggests, is about three sisters, Bettine, Ophile and Clothilde, who live together in a lonely house by the sea, miles away from the city, when a stranger named Paris arrives and everything changes for the sisters.

The Three Incestuous Sisters - 2

Bettine, the youngest, falls in love with Paris. The oldest, Ophile also feels that she loves the young man and then the whole story falls into place, with the middle sister Clothilde playing her own role.

The Three Incestuous Sisters - 3

Niffenegger’s writing is simple and weird in most places, as you will experience when reading the book. The relationship between the three sisters is strange and then there is also the element of magic involved.

The Three Incestuous Sisters - 4

There is a lot which is left to the reader to deduce from the story. There are fewer sentences and everything is said through pictures, which is befitting for a book like this one.

The Three Incestuous Sisters - 5

And to top it all, the book is not creepy at all as the title suggests. The relationships are almost mystical in nature and pass time like sand through a sieve. It is a beautifully conceptualized book and I cannot give away much or else it will turn out to be a spoiler. All I can say is that you need to experience “The Three Incestuous Sisters” for yourself and trust me you will not forget it.

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