Tag Archives: Love

Something Bright, Then Holes by Maggie Nelson

Something Bright, Then Holes Title: Something Bright, Then Holes
Author: Maggie Nelson
Publisher: Soft Skull Press
ISBN: 978-1593762308
Genre: Poems, Prose
Pages: 96
Source: Publisher
Rating: 5 Stars

Maggie Nelson is a genius. No really, she actually is. Have no doubt when it comes to this. Her prose and poetry shines and is enchanting to the very last word. I have read close to 3 books by her and I can say with complete confidence that there is no one like her. Sometimes I do not even know if her writing is prose or poetry or a combination of both. Whatever it is, it is glorious and deserves to be read by one and all.

Something Bright, Then Holes is full of empathy. Everything she writes is as a matter of fact. To me that stands out in her writing and the only reason why I love her writing the way I do, beside of course the language. However, you cannot separate the two anyway. Also, this collection cannot be compared to Bluets and you shouldn’t if you have read Bluets. This collection is divided into three parts – a new relationship being embarked on and a polluted waterway in Brooklyn, the second is the aftermath of a paralysing accident that Nelson’s friend goes through and the third is her attempt to get over a failed relationship.

Each section is raw, intense and utterly heartbreaking. It is as though you are being tied to a chair and the person you love the most is walking away from you, and you cannot do anything about it. The collection is unapologetic and she doesn’t put on a brave face – her writing conveys, mostly painfully, what she is going through. Each sentence stands out from the other and lends itself a new voice. Maggie Nelson as usual doesn’t disappoint at all. Everything is satisfactory, even the hurt and the pain, especially the hurt and the pain. Read it. Please be prepared to weep.

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Notes on a Nervous Planet by Matt Haig

Notes on a Nervous Planet by Matt Haig Title: Notes on a Nervous Planet
Author: Matt Haig
Publisher: Canongate Books
ISBN: 978-1786892676
Genre: Non-Fiction
Pages: 320
Source: Publisher
Rating: 4 Stars

This is a world of nerves. Of nervousness (as the title rightly suggests), of anxiety and of excess. Everything is in excess and we do not know when to stop or how to control our lives. We are constantly on the edge and losing the very essence of being human. Our lives are spiraling out of control and we perhaps do not know what to do. Matt Haig’s books are about mental health issues we face, the ones he has faced and continues to. The only difference is that he speaks about it, Haig communicates and comes from a place of darkness to speak through his books on issues that we prefer to be silent about.

“Notes on a Nervous Planet” is about what we go through on a daily basis and yet continue to and not battle it because we do not know how to. Haig not only tells us about the issues in detail but also lets us know what he does to combat them, and we could also do that, if we like. For instance, how to not be on the phone constantly, how to get off social media once in a while, how to sleep more and things that we think of but not implement on most of the time.

Haig’s writing is personal. He writes from the heart (using the cliché phrase and apologies for that) and it is clear in the writing. It is all about how to stay sane anymore on a planet such as ours. I loved the way the book is structured, looking at each thing that is messing with our minds and the possible suggestions to each of them – from lack of sleep to addiction to work and play balance to questioning the habits and lifestyles of the digital age.

“Notes on a Nervous Planet” makes you look at life without being preachy about it. All it does is make you want to reclaim humanity, little by little if need be. Matt Haig cleverly and beautifully deconstructs the world we live in and provides suggestions, if not answers or solutions on how to conquer. “Notes on a Nervous Planet” if nothing will make you feel that someone out there knows what you are going through and is able to understand it beautifully to express it the way you will feel a connect. It is the book for our times and much needed. Do read it, please.

 

The Pisces by Melissa Broder

The Pisces by Melissa Broder Title: The Pisces
Author: Melissa Broder
Publisher: Hogarth
ISBN: 978-1524761554
Genre: Literary Fiction, Humour
Pages: 288
Source: Publisher
Rating: 5 Stars

Give me some time while I figure what genre “The Pisces” falls under. Give me some time while I get back to breathing normally as “The Pisces” has knocked my breath out of me and I don’t know how to breathe anymore. Give me some time to recover and be up and about (I don’t know how much time it will take) as right now I am under the spell of a book known as “The Pisces” (if you haven’t seen me mention it twice already and I haven’t even begun the review) by Melissa Broder – a book that is already one of my favourite reads of 2018.

Like I said, it isn’t easy to categorize or fit “The Pisces” into a genre and perhaps it is better this way. At the same time, it is unlike any other book I have read. It has love, surrealism, loss and to top it all, a merman. Yes, you got that right. A merman in love with a regular washed-up woman who has almost given up on the idea of love and lust. But like any good book, there is more to what meets the eye and for that you only have to read the book.

Lucy is despondent after her break-up to the point of self-destruction. She leaves Phoenix to go to L.A. to dog-sit for her half-sister Annika for the summer. And in-between group therapy sessions, she meets Theo, a merman, one balmy evening and this is where it all begins.

It is kinda strange to get into the book from the time Lucy meets Theo. We are conditioned a certain way to look beyond the ordinary. We just do not and perhaps never will. Having said that, Lucy is strangely drawn to Theo, again and again till she cannot resist any longer. They converse, they make love, they have hungry sex and of course at the heart of it all, there is the ever-eternal quest for love.

Broder’s characters could be anybody. Literally anybody. The voices, the speech, the expressions and the emotions are so real that you cannot help but relate to all of them. What got me going from the first page was humour. As a policy perhaps, I do not read funny books and this one though doesn’t belong there, it made me laugh out really loud and without any inhibition. Through Lucy, Broder infuses so much wit, candour and sarcasm in the book that it is more than just rib-tickling. It is outrageous to the point of being excellent! I also found myself thanking whoever it is that this wasn’t written by a man, or else it would have been terrible, in my opinion.

“The Pisces” will for sure have you thinking more about unusual alliances and how most of the time as we make our way through life, we forget to embrace it for what it really is. There is a lot of life in this book – it has a lot of moments of the “reality wind” knocking you down but it also has moments when it picks you right up and gives you a semblance of hope.

The Italian Teacher by Tom Rachman

The Italian Teacher by Tom Rachman Title: The Italian Teacher
Author: Tom Rachman
Publisher:Riverrun
ISBN:978-1786482587
Genre:Literary Fiction
Pages: 336
Source:Publisher
Rating:4 Stars

After a very long time, I read a book about art and its understanding and more than anything else about the value it holds in our lives. “The Italian Teacher” is a melting pot of everything – well, almost – it is about art, its integrity, how to preserve it, the frailty of humans, and of relationships we hold close and the ones that often break way too easily.

Pinch’s parents are both artists. To a very large extent it is the bane of his life, but somehow Pinch learns to live with it. His mother, Natalie, is a maker of pottery and quite eccentric at that. While his father, Bear Bavinsky is a renowned painter who only cares about his art and nothing else in the world means anything to him. Pinch only wants his father to notice him and show him some affection.

Pinch wants to become an artist and his dissuaded by his father, who leaves Natalie and Pinch in Italy, moving to America where other wives and children await him. Years pass. Pinch wants to chronicle his father’s life but ends up teaching Italian in London. One fine day Bear dies and Pinch comes up with a plan to ensure his father’s legacy is secure.

That in short is the plot of the book. But this is just the surface. There is a lot which takes place that I haven’t even mentioned. The rawness of emotions, passion for art and above all the desire to keep proving oneself to ones we love is at the crux of this book. Rachman strikes so many chords and presses all the right buttons when it comes to emotions and relatability (we all can relate to it – after all it is all about ambition and love at the end of the day).

“The Italian Teacher” is an immersive experience. I could sense everything – the way Rachman weaves not only the story but the passages and chapters on art are so stunning that I often thought I was there, as it was all unfolding. The book starts in 1955 and goes on till 2018 and the sheer expanse of the book – plus to ensure to tie everything together is no easy task. The span of the book is done justice to by Rachman. The relationship between a son and his father shines throughout the book – it is so complex and layered that you are only left thinking about your relationship with your parents.

At the same time the questions of art and what it takes to be an artist are deftly managed and in relation to the world that changes across the book. “The Italian Teacher” is a feast of a read which is not to be missed.

 

Kevin by Rob Biddulph

Kevin Title: Kevin
Author: Rob Biddulph
Publisher: HarperCollins Children’s Books
ISBN: 9780008207410
Genre: Picture Book, Children’s Books
Pages: 32
Source: Publisher
Rating: 5 Stars

“Kevin” is a book for children written by a child at heart. Did I tell you that I absolutely love and adore picture books or board books? In my opinion, they are some of the most profound books you will ever read. That’s true at least in my experience of reading them all these years. Children’s books are also very soothing. They help lift the weight of the world off your shoulders and live a little. To see the world afresh with a new pair of eyes and that’s what is needed these days, given the times we live in.

Sid Gibbons is in trouble yet again. He is always making a mess and his mum is always losing her patience with him. So this time when he makes a mess of the house and things (yet again) he blames it on Kevin, his big furry, vanilla and pink friend. And while he thinks all is well, he is in for a surprise as Kevin just might not be an imaginary friend after all.

I absolutely loved this picture book. It is extremely beautifully illustrated by Rob and the words are just as impactful. The book is joyful and uplifting. In a world surrounded by hate and misery, we need more books such as these to make us understand and realize that perhaps all is not lost. Most adults I know think children’s books aren’t meant for them but that’s just an adult who refuses to pander to the child within. Don’t be that person. Read widely. Read diversely. Read picture books as well – all the time.