Tag Archives: Graphix

Hey, Kiddo by Jarrett J. Krosoczka

hey, kiddo by jarrett j. krosoczka Title: Hey, Kiddo: How I Lost My Mother, Found My Father, and Dealt with Family Addiction
Author: Jarrett J. Krosoczka
Publisher: Graphix, Scholastic
ISBN: 978-0545902472
Genre: Graphic Memoirs, Comics
Pages: 320
Source: Publisher
Rating: 4 stars

I love graphic memoirs. They make the pain of the protagonist bearable to the reader. It doesn’t feel all that much to handle, but it is. Because it is done in the form of pictures and that makes it even more real. Hey, Kiddo by Jarrett J. Krosoczka is a graphic memoir that will cut like a knife and make you see the true brilliance of the graphic memoir.

Jarrett is in kindergarten when his teacher asks him to draw his family. We all know that some of us have more complicated families than others. Jarrett’s mom is an addict, his father is a mystery and Jarrett doesn’t know where to search for him, or even his name for that matter. He lives with his grandparents who are old and don’t know how to take care of a child anymore, but they try their best. In all of this is Jarrett trying to go through childhood – making his life more real and normal, and finally leading to his teenage years when he wants to know more about his family.

Hey, Kiddo is ironically hilarious. It is the kind of book that is feel-good and not-so-feel-good at the same time. The trauma that one goes through if one parent is an addict is unimaginable, and to add to that a father who isn’t around, just makes it worse. This book is like a support group in itself – in a strange way it just helps you soldier on.

Hey, Kiddo is one of those graphic memoirs that will help conversations in families – where relatives are stand-in parents, where there can be hope for the young, and more than anything else what does family really mean. I know a lot of memoirs perhaps have been written of this nature, and yet to me this book stood out and struck a chord even though I have never gone through something like this. That’s the power of good storytelling, I guess.

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