Tag Archives: FSG

Let’s No One Get Hurt by Jon Pineda

Let's No One Get Hurt by Jon PinedaTitle: Let’s No One Get Hurt
Author: Jon Pineda
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 978-0374185244
Genre: Literary Fiction
Pages: 256
Source: Publisher
Rating: 4  Stars

Sometimes I really wish some books did not have to be this violent – physically, emotionally or mentally. But I also think sometimes we need to show that violence for what the world is and art does imitate life after all. “Let’s No One Get Hurt” is so redemptive and yet somehow seemed so dark as it progressed. The writing is raw, visceral and yet so tender in so many places that you can almost sense the attachment between the young girl and the three men she lives with. We after all make our own home, where we find it.

Fifteen-year-old Pearl lives in an abandoned boathouse with her father – a disgraced college professor and two other men, deep in the American South. All four live on the margins and make do with what they can. There is a sense of weird kind of family but each of them looks after the other and are slowly but surely making sense of the world as days go by.

Enter: Mason Boyd who is also known as “Main Boy” and whose father has purchased the property Pearl and her family are squatting, putting him in a position of power between the two kids, leading to dynamics changing that Pearl never thought of.

The writing is very poetic, to the point of it being poetic-prose and feels very satisfying most of the time. Yet the nagging thought of something bad will happen which keeps haunting the reader. Pearl and her makeshift family (those characters are something else, trust me I can only urge you to read the book to know them better) has been thought of so beautifully, even if the moments of tenderness and grace are not so much, you learn to sit patiently for them to come.

“Let’s No One Get Hurt” captures the essence of power, violence and redemption wonderfully and with parallel stories and layers to the larger narrative. It is a book that will break your heart mostly but will let you heal yourself. A lot of you might think that there is nothing new about it, but you have to read it to believe what Pineda has created – a stunning portrait of loss, love and turmoil in the South.

 

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Fresh Complaint: Stories by Jeffrey Eugenides

Fresh Complaint Title: Fresh Complaint: Stories
Author: Jeffrey Eugenides
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 978-0374203061
Genre: Short Stories, Literary Fiction
Pages: 304
Source: Publisher
Rating: 5 Stars

Jeffrey Eugenides’ writing has come a long way. Who am I to judge that? His ardent fan. One of his ardent fans, who could not get enough of The Virgin Suicides or Middlesex or The Marriage Plot (weakest among the three and yet, I loved it to bits). One of his fans who cannot stop raving about his new book “Fresh Complaint”, a collection of short stories that shows family love, discovery of the self, adolescence, identity and what it means to be American (well, not all the time) through ten stunning stories (two of them which I found to be off, but loved them nonetheless).

I have also always believed that writing short stories is way more difficult than the novel. Short stories have to be taut. You cannot take liberties with time and space as you would in a novel and that makes them even more difficult when it comes to engaging with readers. In Eugenides’ stories we meet people who are broken, who are whole, who go through life in a daze and some who think they have it all under control and stumble only to realize that this isn’t the life they wanted anyway.

My favourite stories in this collection are “Baster” – which is funny and yet so tragic and also “Air Mail” – which is about Mitchell whose story was left hanging in The Marriage Plot and this story somewhat gives it closure. “Complainers”, the first story in the collection is about dementia, old age and above all of the beautiful friendship two women share over the years. And last but not the least, I absolutely could not get enough of the title story. “Fresh Complaint” is a story that could very well have been a novel. It is the story of a high school student whose wish to escape her immigrant family has consequences on a British physicists’ life beyond repair.

Characters in this collection are not kind all the time. They are just human. Eugenides allows his characters to make their mistakes, live their dreams and see regrets for what they are. He takes you to uncomfortable places and is not apologetic about it. These stories date from 1989 to 2017, out of which eight were previously published (I hadn’t read any). “Fresh Complaint” is a collection of stories that are real, insightful and dark, allowing characters to hide, to be seen and not without some humour as well.

 

Swimmer among the Stars: Stories by Kanishk Tharoor

91B0D9x1GZL Title: Swimmer among the Stars: Stories
Author: Kanishk Tharoor
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Genre: Short Stories
Pages: 256
Source: Publisher
Rating: 4 Stars

It is not easy to write a short story. More than anything else, I believe it isn’t easy to write a good short story. There are many writers who can write beautiful prose but it is all limited only to the novel. When they try dabbling in the short-story form it somehow falls flat on their face. Short story is a form that folds novels into itself if done the right way. But then again that’s just my way of thinking when it comes to writing and appreciating this form. I also think another barometer for me is that I shouldn’t feel deprived or want more while reading a short-story. Neither must I feel that the story is too long. It should be of the right length to engage and keep the reader entertained.

Kanishk Tharoor’s “Swimmer among the Stars” has been one of the most satisfying reads for me this year. His debut short-story collection was nothing like what I had read before and maybe that’s why it opened new vistas for me, new dreams were dreamed and though some stories did disappoint (not too much though), I could let that slide by because the entire collection is just worth every word.

Table Tennis is played in zero gravity in a post-apocalyptic tale. In another, a team of anthropologists’ trek to a remote village to meet a woman who is her language’s last surviving speaker – to also record her for the sake of posterity. A story of an elephant’s fascinating journey is the crux of another story. Of course, I cannot forget the story of the seven days of a town that is about to be razed by an invading army. The people’s thoughts, their stories, their loves and disappointments are so stark that I enjoyed every bit of it.

Thirteen stories form this book – give it the varied voices that it deserves and must be lauded for. Reading this book reminded me sometimes of Calvino’s writing (magic realism and how), Borges’s vision, Arabian Nights’ span, Angela Carter’s grandeur and Murakami’s restraint. It is all there in this cracker of a read.

Kanishk’s writing doesn’t seem forced at all. Not one word seems out of place or something that could have been given a miss. The book is detailed (which I never have a problem with) way too much and that only works to the advantage of what Tharoor wants to communicate through his stories. The fable-like quality of the stories adds much-needed charm and dreamlike essence. All said and done, I will for sure be waiting for his next book.

Book Review: Hild by Nicola Griffith

CT hild-cover.jpg Title: Hild
Author: Nicola Griffith
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, FSG Originals
ISBN: 978-0374280871
Genre: Historical Fiction
Pages: 560
Source: Publisher
Rating: 5/5

“Hild” was a book that just appeared from nowhere. I had heard of it and somehow wanted to read it, as happens with most books. The story is set in seventh-century Britain and that caused for some difficulty to get into it to begin with, however once you get over the inhibition, the plot takes you over and that is enough.

“Hild” is a fantasy. It is historical. It is literary. It is everything rolled into one book. Hild can read and see the future. She is born in the times of turmoil. Everything is haywire and no one knows what is going to happen next. The book is fast paced and as a reader one does not know what is going to happen next. The funny thing is that I could not even predict what is going to happen. It is that good.

So, Hild is the king’s youngest niece. She is living in the middle Ages. She is the child that will become Saint Hilda of Whitby. The novel is about the person she might have been in her early years. Hild’s father, Prince Hereric is the nephew to King Edwin of Northumbria. He was poisoned. Hild was brought up in the court of King Edwin and Griffith traces her story from Hild to Saint Hilda.

The writing is stark and Griffith makes no bones about anything. There is struggle for power on every single page in the book and this is where Hild has to come to be and become the person she wants to be. There is a lot happening throughout the book – politics – which is at the core of the book, there is magic and then there are choices which Hild has to make at the end of it all.

I found the book very riveting and extremely charming, given the setting. Griffith brings to life one of the historical characters that people maybe are not aware of too much or do not talk of. It is a book if you love knowing more about historical characters and even if you don’t, then this is a good place to start with.

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