Category Archives: Hachette Book Group

Misery by Stephen King

misery-by-stephen-king Title: Misery
Author: Stephen King
Publisher: Hodder and Stoughton, Hachette UK
ISBN: 978-1444720716
Genre: Thriller
Pages: 400
Source: Personal Copy
Publisher: 5 Stars

There is this insane, crazy, bordering psycho side to all of us, which is conveniently hidden and tucked for good (or so we think) till it snaps. When it snaps, I think, or rather I most certainly believe that all people are capable of harming, of doing things beyond their wildest imagination and some of us also regret what we do and some don’t. That’s really how the world functions sometimes and you live with it, as you do with everyday kindness. Scarily enough, at times you also live with everyday cruelty and that’s what the master of horror, Mr. Stephen King reveals to us, book by book.

My affair with King’s books started when I was thirteen. Since then, I haven’t looked back. I thought I had read all his books (not the ones written as Bachman – I cannot stand those) and then I realized very late in life (as late as last month) that I hadn’t read Misery. Had this been me two years ago, I would have flipped knowing how I missed this, but today I looked at it as an opportunity to read this one and boy oh boy was I in for something!

“Misery” is almost Meta and then again it isn’t. You would almost be fooled into believing that King was drawing from his experiences (and maybe he was) but some of them could be taken from his life – the way a writer thinks, agonizes over and finally ends up writing a book or more than just a book. “Misery” is about a writer – Paul Sheldon and his so-called number one fan Annie Wilkes. Paul is a very successful writer because of his Misery Chastain series, but now Paul has had enough of her and kills her in his new novel. Unfortunately for Paul, he meets with an accident and is rescued by Annie, who is very very unhappy about Misery dying and wants to take matters in her own hand, by keeping Paul captive and asking him to write a new Misery novel for freedom. This, in brief is the plot of Misery.

Now to the characters: Annie Wilkes gave me the chills. I don’t want to meet someone like her ever, not even for the curiosity of it all. I would rather be safe than sorry. King knows his characters inside out – well of course, but the edginess and knowing that they can fall off the sane balcony any given day is what intrigues me to his books. His writing we all know is impeccable; the eye for detail, the scenarios and specifically in this book to imagine the torture inflicted on Sheldon is simply stunning. I couldn’t stop reading this one – and there were also times when I just had to stop because I was scared and mind you, this one is not a horror novel, but pretty much there.

Difficult Women by Roxane Gay

difficult-women-by-roxane-gay Title: Difficult Women
Author: Roxane Gay
Publisher: Corsair, Hachette Book Group
ISBN: 978-1472152770
Pages: 272
Genre: Literary Fiction, Short Stories
Source: Publisher
Rating: 5 Stars

This is the second time I was reading a book by Roxane Gay and let me tell you, yet again, I was completely blown over. When the world is on and about w0men rights and rightly so, Gay does it like no one else. She speaks on its behalf and also doesn’t seem like an armchair observer who goes on endlessly without making any sense. In fact her book of essays “Bad Feminist” is spot on about the changes we can make as individuals when it comes to equal rights. I think everyone must read her collection of stories – “Difficult Women” now or later, but read you must.

“Difficult Women” is a dark collection of stories – not all of them are dark, some of them are also funny, redeeming and feature colourful female protagonists who just are trying to make their way in a so-called man’s world. They could be writers, housewives or strippers – their profession doesn’t really matter – they still love hard and work harder to get where they want to. I was struck with the soft interior to these stories and yet it had such a tough exterior that a reader can be fooled at the beginning and will begin to see light as every story progresses and reveals something about itself. Roxane’s writing is addictive and the depth of understanding has every layer attached to it – from the unknown to the surreal to desire and humanity in places least expected.

Some stories are one dimensional but they also seemed to work for me. I was most touched by “I Will Follow You” (about two sisters and their captor), Le Negra Blanca (a definite read in the collection) and “North Country”. These are by far my favourites in this collection of twenty-one gems. To a very large extent, the strong women in this collection are based on Gay’s life and the women she has encountered. If you’ve read Bad Feminist you can relate to some of those women in these tales. But I think you will find the women in these stories anywhere – if you look harder that is. The intent of these stories is to give readers a glimpse into the inner world of women – why they do what they do, why they think the thoughts they do, or for that matter why they love the way they do. At this point I must mention the title story ‘Difficult Women’ which is a collection of vignettes of women who just want to live life on their terms.

A couple of times it was tough for me to turn the pages of this collection – only because it seemed so real and heartbreaking. At others, I even thought most of the stories were repetitive. But that is something I was willing to overlook only because of the beauty of the language. “Difficult Women” will make you think about the world around you and the women that inhabit it. I am most certainly not lending my copy to anyone.

365 Stories: Day 12: Difficult Women by Roxane Gay

difficult-women-by-roxane-gay

After reading her book of essays, “Bad Feminist”, I knew I had to read more of Roxane Gay. There was no other option. A writer enslaves you and that’s it. You have to read everything by him or her. You don’t have a choice.

So I started reading her collection of stories (got an advanced copy) and one of those stories is the story of the day – “Difficult Women” (this also happens to be the titular story) – a tale of women – the mad kind, the crazy kind and the difficult kind.

This is a story of different women who are unnamed throughout the story and their lives – in vignettes of course but still cuts so deep and you can see what goes around you – you can see almost every woman you know in each of these women and that is heartbreaking.

I recommend you read everything by Roxane Gay.

Moonstone – the Boy who never Was by Sjón

Moonstone - The Boy who Never Was by Sjon Title: Moonstone – the Boy who never Was
Author: Sjón
Publisher: Sceptre Books, Hachette
ISBN: 978-1473613133
Genre: Novella, Literary Fiction
Pages: 160
Source: Publisher, ARC
Rating: 5 Stars

“Moonstone – the Boy who Never was” by Sjón (pronounced Shawn) came to me in a boxful of other books. My eye rested on this one, because I had heard a lot about the author’s previous book “The Whispering Muse”. I wanted to find out for myself what the whole fuss was about this writer and his style. Let me tell you at the very onset that “Moonstone” will for sure be one of the top 10 books I would have read this year. Hands down!

It is the kind of book that doesn’t let you be till you are done with it. It is a historic novella in the sense. It is also a subtle love story. It is about struggle and the will to live against all odds and do what one must do anyway. It is about cinema- about the small things that make everything else seem so big and grand. It is a book set in 1918 and in Iceland – of course given the author is from there.

The book is about Mani Steinn (this is where Moonstone comes from – but again how it appears in the book is heartbreaking) – a 16-year old waif who is an enigmatic character. He lives with his great-grandmother’s sister. The volcano Katla has erupted and can be seen colouring the sky night and day from the streets of Reykjavik where the boy lives. The Spanish flu will arrive. The Great War grinds on. Things change. Mani has two loves of his life – Sola G and the movies. He loves the movies and well what he does for a living is something you will find out as you read the book.

The flu changes everything – the place, people, their lives, dimming the line between reality and delirium. For Mani it is about coming of age in one of the most brutal ways, about loving from afar, and the idea of watching movies one after the other is what life is all about. He cannot comprehend any other life till incidents set in motion and life changes completely.

Sjón’s prose is heartbreaking, crisp and there is so much said in such few words. This is the kind of writing that leaves you wanting more. From Mani’s life to the impact the flu has on the town to the magic of silent movies to describing the year 1918 and that too in about two months when the novel is set, is no easy feat. At this point, I must also speak of the translation by Victoria Cribb which is superlative. I’m sure it manages to convey what the author set of to.

“Moonstone” is the kind of book that evokes this melancholy feeling inside you, it makes you want to reach out and hug the writer for writing something so remarkable. It is a short book with a very big heart. I know for one that I will most certainly read a lot more that has been written by Sjón and I highly recommend that you do the same. Start with this one.

The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith

The Cuckoo's Calling by Robert Galbraith Title: The Cuckoo’s Calling
Author: Robert Galbraith
Series: Cormoran Strike – Book 1
Publisher: Mullholland Books
ISBN: 978-0316206853
Genre: Suspense, Detective, Crime
Pages: 464
Source: Personal Copy
Rating: 5/5

With great trepidation, I picked up “The Cuckoo’s Calling” by Robert Gailbraith. There was already so much written and said about it almost two years ago, that I did not even know if I wanted to read it or not. I am glad that I picked it up. Please do not even compare it to the Harry Potter series. You just cannot. May be that is why J.K. Rowling had to change her identity and write this series and once the identity was out, well then the critics had their field day- both good and bad.

“The Cuckoo’s Calling” is the first in the Cormoran Strike (the name of the detective) series and while the third one is just out, there are more lined up. I don’t know how many though. All I can tell you is that the book is something else for sure and I cannot wait to read the second and the third installments.

What is the first book about?

Of course, at the heart of the book is the Private Detective Cormoran Strike – the ex-army guy with his own complicated personal life and skeletons in the closet, his business which is drying up, and of course he had to have a messy break-up with his fiancée.
So everything is downhill till Robin a temp arrives from the Temp Agency and ends up becoming a permanent secretary/assistant of sorts and then a case lands up on his doorstep which he just cannot refuse. It is a high-profile case – that of a supermodel – falling to death from her third-floor Mayfair apartment and her brother suspects foul play and hires Cormoran to investigate further. This in short is the gist. It is like any other hard-boiled detective novel you might say. So what makes it any different?

I guess it is the writing for sure but it is also the noir element that runs through the book, given it is set in London and also given how the characters are all people with shades of grey as it should be in a book like this. I instantly took a shine to Cormoran and the wry humour that prevailed throughout. The working class of London is also very well depicted, without leaning to any social or political context. The lives of people – both the detectives and the suspects are so detailed that it is a joy to read the book and know more about them.

“The Cuckoo’s Calling” is the kind of book that cannot be read in one sitting. It needs to be cherished and savoured and not read in one go. At least I wasn’t able to. Cormoran Strike is a detective that will grow on you as he did on me and I cannot wait to read The Silkworm.

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The Cuckoo’s Calling (English)