Daily Archives: March 9, 2020

Apartment by Teddy Wayne

Apartment by Teddy Wayne Title: Apartment
Author: Teddy Wayne
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 978-1635574005
Genre: Literary Fiction
Pages: 208
Source: Publisher
Rating: 4/5

I absolutely love books with unnamed narrators. You don’t even know if they are reliable or not. You don’t know their name, so in all probability, there is so much hidden that comes to fore and that somehow always happens when I venture into such reads.

Apartment by Teddy Wayne is an excellent book, not only on the human condition but also on a brilliant character study of loners and how men sabotage their relationships. The unnamed narrator sublets an illegal bedroom while he attends Columbia’s MFA writing program. At the program, he meets Billy, a Midwest, working-class bartender who wants to write and make a way in the world. Basis one incident at the workshop, the pair strike an unlikely friendship, resulting in Billy getting a place to stay and the narrator somehow desperately needing Billy’s approval and validation.

So, the book started off strangely for me. The passive-aggressive dance between the men was somehow too much to handle and then it became easy. There are opinions and several of them throughout the book, which makes for very interesting reading.

Wayne’s writing falls on the thriller/mystery device and somehow that worked for me, even though there were some parts when the characters did not connect with me. That being said, I did finish the book in three days, while reading other books.

Apartment is fast-paced and well-plotted. It keeps you on the edge (in some ways) and also makes you aware of what happens when relationships take a bitter turn when there is no good side or bad side when there is just how events play out, and how people react to emotions – of self and others. Apartment is a great story about men and their lives, quite interestingly told.

Fabulous by Lucy Hughes-Hallett

Fabulous by Lucy Hughes-Hallett Title: Fabulous
Author: Lucy Hughes-Hallett
Publisher: Fourth Estate
ISBN: 978-0008334857
Genre: Short Stories, Fairy Tales & Myths
Pages: 224
Source: Publisher
Rating: 4/5

March 2020 is turning out to be a great month when it comes to short-story collections, and Fabulous by Lucy Hughes-Hallett is the third one.

These eight stories are derived from popular and not-so-popular myths. Myths are constantly being adapted and this is one example of that. Each of these stories is set in modern Britain. The characters therefore are in tune with people we hear of or meet; people-traffickers, prostitutes, migrant workers, estate agents, librarians, and office-goers. These are ordinary people really, but all their stories are inspired by Graeco-Roman myths, or from the Bible, or from folklore.

We know these stories. We have heard of them or read them in their original form (if that’s a thing really). We know of Orpheus, Psyche, Tristan and Isolde, the Pied Piper, and Mary Magdalene, and if we don’t then these stories will make you want to know about them.

For me the stories that stood out were Pasiphae and the minotaur with seaside gangsters, the one with Mary Magdalena and Joseph, and the Pied Piper one. Having said that, each story is a commentary on the state we live in and what we have become as a people.

Hughes-Hallett’s style is direct. The range of retellings is wide enough, so it doesn’t get boring or mundane. I love the way the themes are constructed and presented to the reader. The stories are familiar and yet not so familiar. She blends the everyday with the mythical with great ease, and with each chapter I was more hooked and intrigued to know more. Fabulous is a collection of short stories that are whimsy, fantastical, sometimes literal, sometimes metaphorical, and random which worked beautifully for me.

 

And I Do Not Forgive You: Stories & Other Revenges by Amber Sparks

And I Do Not Forgive You - Stories & Other Revenges by Amber Sparks Title: And I Do Not Forgive You: Stories & Other Revenges
Author: Amber Sparks
Publisher: Liveright, W.W. Norton & Co.
ISBN: 978-1631496202
Genre: Short Stories, Magical Realism
Pages: 192
Source: Publisher
Rating: 4/5

Amber Sparks writes short fiction with such deft and empathy, that it manages to hit all the right spots for me. There is fantasy in her stories, grounded in reality of our lives that make us see lives of others, while always holding a reflection up to ours. This collection of 22 stories is strange, mesmerising, and often tend to go to dark places, which some readers may not be comfortable with. She reimagines myths and legends, folk tales, fairy tales, and sometimes even reimagines the world we inhabit.

Whether she is writing about a teenage girl befriending a ghost in her trailer park or about a princess who wants to run away from her father, the King who wants to marry her, she packs a punch almost most of the time. These stories are about women, for women, and written by a woman. These stories put them to the front and that’s what I loved the most about them. There is no “male perspective” and to me that is always refreshing.

The stories might come across as whimsical sometimes but they are extremely profound (I reread some and loved them even more). For instance, love as sacrifice in We Destroy the Moon – that speaks of  new prophet or demigod or leader at the end, implies that why can’t a woman be at the helm of things? What is then the definition of a woman? Is she a mere follower? Or could be a leader?

The relationships between characters in these stories take their time to develop, some even come to light right at the end and that’s perhaps the beauty of these stories. Nothing is expected. Nothing is the same. From husbands who grow wings, to lion tamers that get eaten, to moments of extraordinary happiness that spurt to life here and there, Spark’s stories are dangerous, on-the-edge, comforting (strangely), and dream of a world that is possible. A world of freedom.