Daily Archives: September 7, 2017

Immoderate Men: Stories by Shikhandin

Immoderate Men Title: Immoderate Men: Stories
Author: Shikhandin
Publisher: Speaking Tiger
ISBN: 978-9385755965
Genre: Short Stories
Pages: 200
Source: Publisher
Rating: 4 Stars

Short stories intrigue me. Something about them that leads me to them almost quite often, mostly between the novels that I read. After “Men without Women”, here is another collection on the lives of men titled “Immoderate Men” spanning across 1 1 stories – telling tales of various men and their lives which are sometimes made easy and sometimes not. These stories are about circumstances that surround us – ones that can be fought and changed and some that cannot. They are about the human mind and the human heart and the workings which are unknown to man, no matter how hard he tries to understand them.

The stories sometimes in this collection are wistful and sometimes profound, sometimes heartbreaking and sometimes just a matter of fact. In short, there is almost everything for everyone to put it quite loosely. The stories are heartwarming and also sometimes quite cruel. They question what society lays out for us and sometimes they are merely spectators. From a grandfather who sits on a park bench contemplating the beauty of his daughter-in-law and the son who abandoned them to Manish discovering something not so savory about his wife to six friends talking about everything in a café, till things take a turn of their own – these stories are visceral, vivid and completely unexpected.

Shikandin’s writing is taut and doesn’t waste any time with the scenery or the weather. There is however a lot of atmosphere that seeps in to the book without the reader knowing about it – sometimes took me by surprise as well. There is a structure to the stories and there are times when Shikhandin breaks it mercilessly, leaving the reader lost and confused. The stories take you back and forth – make you see lives differently, you will also find some similarities between these men’s lives and yours and sometimes you will be thankful that your lives are so different.

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Borne by Jeff VanderMeer

Borne Title: Borne
Author: Jeff VanderMeer
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 9780374115241
Genre: Literary Fiction, Science-Fiction, Dystopian Fiction
Pages: 330
Source: Publisher
Rating: 5 Stars

“Borne” is an unusual book that takes some time getting into. It isn’t an easy read. Don’t be fooled by the initial pages. If anything, it will also drive you in a tizzy, trying to sometimes make sense of what is going on. It is dystopian and not so much because we can see what will happen to us if we don’t take care of our surroundings and the environment. This was a wake-up call for me but more than anything else, VanderMeer’s writing (I have read his The Southern Reach trilogy and it is fantastic) is first-class and he is most certainly at the top of his game.

Rachel survives as a scavenger in a ruined city – destroyed by drought and conflict, the other half destroyed by experiments (which were obviously in vain) conducted by the Company – a biotech firm, now rendered useless. Rachel lives with her partner Wick who deals with his own homegrown psychoactive biotech. And in all of this one fine day Rachel finds Borne and takes him home. Borne is more than just a green lump and has something magnificent about him. Borne is a constant reminder to Rachel of the life before the so-called apocalypse that took place (albeit of a different kind). She takes care of Borne, nurtures him – he makes sense of the world and makes Rachel believe in the goodness of the world all over again. Till he grows of course and everything goes for a toss. The world they have created is not perfect and Rachel would have to reconsider her decision.

There is a sense of morality about “Borne” which is very high. VanderMeer is okay with you taking any side, and yet it feels that he only wants you to be on one side so to say. He is also great at casting a web of fables – most of the book is that, but it is also the scary future we could have. Jeff’s prose is lucid and yet detailed at so many levels. He stretches your imagination and doesn’t serve anything on a platter, which to me is fantastic. The characters behave strangely and it is great to get to the motive at the end of it. I hope this one also has another two-parts, because to me Borne’s story does not end here. I am certain there is more. So if you like your books to make a chill run down your spine, then this is the one for you.