Daily Archives: September 1, 2017

Under the Midnight Sun by Keigo Higashino. Translated from the Japanese by Alexander O. Smith with Joseph Reeder.

Under the Midnight Sun by Keigo HigashinoTitle: Under the Midnight Sun
Author: Keigo Higashino
Translated from the Japanese by Alexander O. Smith with Joseph Reeder
Publisher: Minotaur Books
ISBN: 978-1250105790
Genre: Literary Thriller
Pages: 560
Source: Publisher
Rating: 5 Stars

Literary thrillers are hard to come by. Let me rephrase this: Good literary thrillers are hard to come by and thank God for Keigo Higashino. I was a fan the minute I finished reading “The Devotion of Suspect X” and then when I read “Salvation of a Saint” I knew I would continue reading whatever he would dish, no matter how good or bad. I think it has got to do with the atmosphere that is built in his novels, and that is so important for a good thriller. The right kind of setting – the fog if necessary, the ambience of the hotel maybe or just describing a regular street. He is a master at that, bordering noir, if there could be Japanese noir (given most of their literature is dark anyway) and almost surpasses himself in it.

“Under the Midnight Sun” is a big book at 560 pages. But at no point do you feel overwhelmed or intimidated reading it, because of its size. The story is so gripping that you want to turn the pages no matter how late it is at night or for that matter early morning. In Osaka, in 1973, the body of a murdered man is found in an abandoned building. Detective Sasagaki is unable to find the murderer. In all of this, the lives of two teenagers – Ryo and Yukiho get embroiled which will leave the reader shocking and gasping for breath as the end of the book nears.

Higashino in this one is mainly concentrating on the aftermath of a crime. Twenty years have passed and it is 1993 and how the teenagers then are impacted by the crime that took place. Why must they get impacted you ask? Well because one of them is the child of the one who got killed and the other the child of the killer. The psychological impact then – as they strive to find the truth behind the killing and how Sasagaki gets involved again is spine-chilling.

Higashino doesn’t mince words while writing. Everything is crystal clear and the way it is supposed to be. The plot while threadbare, as you go along keeps getting layers added to it, which doesn’t really let it remain threadbare for long. The characters are etched to accuracy and no one has received more or less print time. “Under the Midnight Sun” is a feast for any lover of pulp fiction.

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Wings of Fire #1 The Dragonet Prophecy by Tui T. Sutherland

Title: Wings of Fire #1 : The Dragonet Prophecy
Author: Tui T. Sutherland
Publisher: Scholastic
ISBN: 978-0545349239
Genre: Children’s Fantasy, Teens
Pages: 304
Source: Publisher
Rating: 3.5/5

After a long time, I read a book for kids that was super-fun and thrilling at the same time. It was also heartwarming and made no bones of using everything that has been already covered when it comes to dragons, yet it felt so refreshing. “The Dragon Prophecy” is the first book in the “Wings of Fire” series and was first published in 2012. It is also a high-fantasy series might I add but thank God that it doesn’t read like that.

The series as you must have guessed is all about dragons – it goes a step further and introduces a war going on between seven dragon tribes over the throne of SandWings (Game of Thrones but with only dragons). And in all of this we are introduced to Clay (a dragonet) and his four friends (Tsunami, Glory, Starfight and Sunny) who are destined to stop the war and have been raised in a cave under a mountain by three guardians, so no one can harm them. The plot of the book moves around the prophecy, the mystery behind it and the introduction to the dragonets, and more.

The plot exists but is kind of loose right now maybe because this is just the first book and there is so much more to come. The writing is engaging, at times I thought it could have fleshed out the dragonets a lot more but I guess she has left it for later. I am also very happy that Scholastic has brought this series to India. It is the perfect series for middle-graders, teens and even adults to start with. “The Dragonet Prophecy” is a fun read with the correct elements in place for a high-fantasy – which will sure evolve in the coming books (which are out and available by the way).

Honor Girl: A Graphic Memoir by Maggie Thrash

Title: Honor Girl: A Graphic Memoir
Author: Maggie Thrash
Publisher: Candlewick Press
ISBN: 978-0763687557
Genre: Graphic Memoir
Pages: 272
Source: Personal Copy
Rating: 5 Stars

For the longest time after I came out, all I remember reading is gay literature. I devoured all of them – from Edmund White to Gore Vidal to Tennessee Williams and not to forget William Baldwin. I was scared of reading lesbian literature, thinking I would never be able to relate to it, because it wasn’t about two men. Of course, I was highly mistaken. The angst and the pain were the same. The feeling of alienation, even more similar. So basically, I was being an idiot by not exploring more diverse literature, that was right there for the taking.

Then several same-sex love books were being read, despite the gender. It didn’t matter anymore as I discovered the fact that human emotion is the same, no matter what and if I were to discriminate then I wouldn’t be any better than the next person who does the same. Having said that, September has begun with a cracking of a read, a graphic memoir at that, titled “Honor Girl” by Maggie Thrash.

Honor Girl is of course a true story of Maggie’s life – a summer spent at a camp when she was fifteen and why was that so important to her. So yes, the story is about Maggie and self-discovery and all of that at that age, but it is also about first love, which to me is paramount. Maybe that’s why I picked up this book at all. It is about Maggie and the way she feels for a female counselor at the camp and thereby what transpires between the two. It is about them having to be careful about their interactions (given the world we live in and how cruel it can be to same-sex lovers), to confessing their love and the angst and sometimes humor around it.

Maggie’s life is brilliantly told by her, at least the formative years and how it shaped her as a human being (you can tell to some extent). The artwork is beautiful and adorable to a very large extent. What I loved about this book was the entire camping site. The illustrations brought it to life and all I wanted to do was go to a place like this one. The nighttime scenes are done with such vividness that it sucks you into the narrative and sense of place. At the same time, it isn’t easy talking about same-sex love and that too between teenagers and more so when it is from your life, but Maggie does it so beautifully and gracefully at that, it just seems effortless all throughout. The bittersweet moments make the read seem so real – just what might happen to you.

“Honor Girl” is a perfect summer read and more importantly also for young girls who are on the verge of discovering their sexuality and personality. It may help, or it may not – but what it will end up doing is warming the heart. A kind of book you must gift every young girl – whatever she might grow up to be.