The Sialkot Saga by Ashwin Sanghi

The Sialkot Saga by Ashwin Sanghi Title: The Sialkot Saga
Author: Ashwin Sanghi
Publisher: Westland Books
ISBN: 978-9385724060
Genre: Thriller, Indian Fiction
Pages: 588
Source: From the Author
Rating: 4 Stars

I remember reading “Chanakya’s Chant” a couple of years ago and being completely taken in by the book. There was nothing that I did not like about it. I mean here was an Indian Historic thriller that finally did justice to the genre. I could not stop reading the book and finished it in a day. The same happened (well more or less, given the size of this one) while reading ‘The Sialkot Saga’.

‘The Sialkot Saga’ has one of my favourite Indian authors back in the game (I was not a fan of The Krishna Key and some others written by him, to be honest) and how! The book spreads across decades and centuries, till it reaches present day India and will sure have both historic and thriller readers in for a treat.

What is the book about you might ask?

Well, the book is about power – the race to it and it involves two people – Arvind and Arbaaz, both raised in the wake of partition of India and how their lives merge, collide and intertwine at every given step – whether they like it or not, both personally and professionally. They are adversaries – so there is a lot of blood, moments of corporate politics, of anger and in all of this there are moments of humanity, grace and kindness, which take you not by surprise but more like you expected them at some point or the other. Arvind and Arbaaz are characters that won’t easily let go of you and when the book is over, there is this lingering sense of sadness that stays with you and you cannot help but think about the people whose lives you have been a part of as you read through this magnificent thriller.

The historic angle of the book starts from Emperor Ashoka’s reign and ends in today’s time. The book is a tome but you never think of it that way. The pages turn rapidly, all thanks to Ashwin’s seamless and racy plot. Calcutta and Bombay (as known in those times) are vividly described, so much so that I felt I was taking in the Bombay, Delhi and Calcutta of the times before the 80s when I was born.

Sanghi’s writing is crystal clear. Of course he shows but there is also a good mix of showing and telling which I think works wondrously for this book. At no point, did I want to close this. At no point, I felt that there needed to be heavy-duty editing done. It was fine. It is fine the way it is. I would strongly recommend it.

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