Daily Archives: October 17, 2013

Book Review: BUtterfield 8 by John O’Hara

BUtterfield 8 by John O'Hara Title: BUtterfield 8
Author: John O’Hara
Publisher: Penguin Books
ISBN: 9780143124689
Genre: Literary Fiction
Pages: 288
Source: Publisher
Rating: 5/5

I remember the first time I watched BUtterfield 8. I was dazzled by the plot and more so by Elizabeth Taylor. I grew up some. I grew up some more. At twenty-five I realized that it was adapted from a book by the same title, written by John O’Hara and I could not wait to get my hands on it and devour it. I searched everywhere – high and low, but could not find it anywhere. This was way before the online shopping mania struck us. Somehow, I managed to find three of his novels in one book – Appointment in Samarra, BUtterfield 8 and Hope of Heaven. I devoured BUtterfield 8 in one sitting and loved it.

It was Elizabeth Taylor who played Gloria Wandrous so well, that somehow she stayed in my mind. I lost my copy and then got a chance to reread it – a fantastic Penguin Drop Cap edition of the book and it just felt the same way, the first time I read it.

BUtterfield 8 is set in New York. It is New York in 1931 and it is glamorous and ruthless at the same time. It is a society yet to pick up its pieces from the Great Depression and yet it puts on a show and façade for all to see. One Sunday morning, Gloria wakes up in a stranger’s apartment, with a torn evening dress, stockings and a pair of panties. She has nothing to wear. She steals a mink coat from the wardrobe and starts a chain of events – all strangers interconnected by that one action of hers – which but obviously only ends in tragedy for her. This in short is the plot of the book.

O’Hara’s story is bold and candid and Gloria somehow becomes an icon. An icon that no one wants to aspire to be, however she does instil courage and determination in readers. O’Hara’s pen gives us lines full of wit, candour and irony. The only problem with BUtterfield 8 is that there are too many characters in it – that flash and go and then come back, leaving the reader confused at some point.

I guess the beauty of his novels lay in honesty. He told it like he saw it, without sugar-coating anything and in that, lays the genius of a writer. I knew that there could be no other end to the story and yet the writing somehow makes you hopeful to want more for Gloria, than just a doomed love-affair. I guess if that kind of powerful writing hits you, then all you need is hot chocolate and to switch off the cell-phone and devour this book in one straight sitting.

Here is the trailer of the movie starring Elizabeth Taylor:

Book Review: Shady Characters: Ampersands, Interrobangs and other Typographical Curiosities by Keith Houston

Shady Characters by Keith Houston Title: Shady Characters: Ampersands, Interrobangs and other Typographical Curiosities
Author: Keith Houston
Publisher: Particular Books
ISBN: 9781846146473
Genre: Non-Fiction, Graphic Arts, Reference
Pages: 352
Source: Publisher
Rating: 4/5

“Shady Characters: Ampersands, Interrobangs and other Typographical Curiosities” was one of the most unique reads this month for me. I have never come across a book like this before, so I may be thought that it was not for me. However, was proved wrong half-way into it. “Shady Characters” as the name suggests is about characters that we often forget or tend to overlook when it comes to typography or fonts or as part of text.

Keith Houston’s book is about symbols and punctuation and characters that have a past to it and how it is linked to writing in today’s times. For instance, it was wonderful to know about the ampersand and how it came to be. Or for that matter, about the pilcrow which is one of the oldest symbols of the world and yet we don’t know much about it. Like how the @ symbol came to being way back in 1971 – this anecdote I found most interesting, because it was fascinating to know about the symbol which has become an essential part of our lives.

What Keith skilfully does in these chapters about each character is bring out the past and link it beautifully with the present and the future. The writing (which I thought would be tedious at first) is only enjoyable and full of anecdotes. So there is little chance of the reader getting bored. There are ten characters or symbols spoken of and each one has a unique story to tell. The reader has no time to get bored at any point in the book.

“Shady Characters” is about uniqueness. It is about seeing the unknown and sometimes most taken granted for world. The world of punctuation, symbols and other lovely characters that make up the world of semantics and otherwise just add a little bit of charm.

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