Daily Archives: September 17, 2012

Book Review: The Illicit Happiness of Other People by Manu Joseph

Title: The Illicit Happiness of Other People
Author: Manu Joseph
Publisher: Fourth Estate
ISBN: 978-9350293645
Genre: Literary Fiction
Pages: 352
Source: Publisher
Rating: 5/5

Manu Joseph is definitely the most promising writer on the Indian Literary scene as of now and well-deserved of that place in my opinion. Serious Men made a great impact in the literary world and rightly so. It was a sweeping novel of family, doubt, and loss in an emerging India, full of hopes, aspirations and the need to get somewhere. Manu Joseph writes with a keen eye to details. He knows what he wants to convey to the much-eager reader and he delivers to the maximum.

“The Illicit Happiness of Other People” is yet again another example of his genius. The reader should not compare it to Serious Men. It may be the same writing style, but of course, the plots are radically different.

“The Illicit Happiness of Other People” is set in Madras in the early 90s when technology was well on its way to invade the country and the lifestyle changes were crawling up unaware to the Great Indian Middle Class. Ousep Chacko is an anarchist. He is a family man. He is an alcoholic. He wants to know what happened to his first-born seventeen year old Unni Chacko, the highly talented comic book writer and illustrator. Why did he do what he did? What compelled him to? The only clue he has on hand is his son’s comic strip and he has to string and make sense of his son’s life through that and meeting people he doesn’t know existed in Unni’s life.

While this plot is unfolding itself, we have his second son, Thoma who hasn’t shown as much promise as Unni and is often ignored by his father. All his father wants is answers about Unni’s life. The other angle is that of his wife, who is suffering in silence. Unni’s cartoons reveal more than what Ousep wants to know and that reels the story in a completely different direction, with the arrival of a stranger who will change things for the three of them.

The book is beautifully written and heart-breaking to a large extent, with the right doses of humour thrown in. I must admit that it took me sometime to sink into the book at the beginning, but when I did, I could not stop myself from reading. The story is infectious and grows on you. Just when you think that the writing and characters have become predictable, there is a sense of comfort; Joseph surprises you by pulling an unexpected rabbit out of his wordsmith hat.

The writing and the characters reach out to you in ways you can never imagine. Your heart goes out to Ousep and yet there are times you wish he didn’t do things that he does. Thoma as the recluse is brilliantly etched and the mother, though silent plays a crucial part in the book. The highlight of the book for me was when it all made sense, when the book looped in. Characters searching for happiness and fulfillment in a book are most tragic for the reader. It almost holds a mirror sometimes. You then know the ulterior motives of characters. They just want happiness after all, so much so that they start despising others for being happy.

I cannot stop raving about this book. Nothing is out of place and nothing is flawed in the writing. Whoever says that Indian Writing has not yet reached its pinnacle has to read this book to probably take back their words. I would recommend it to whosoever I meet.

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Book Review: The Man Who Tried to Remember by Makarand Sathe

Title: The Man Who Tried to Remember
Author: Makarand Sathe
Publisher: Penguin Viking
ISBN: 9780670086412
Genre: Literary Fiction, Translated Fiction
Pages: 248
Source: Publisher
Rating: 5/5

It would take a lot for a translated work to be detached from its original or the perception of what it might be like to read the original and savor the book in its translated form. It happens to me all the time. I wish I could read those Spanish and Japanese works in their true form; however I do not know the languages. The same happens when reading an Indian translation, which are most often ignored by people.

Indian writers have not just sprung up. They have always been there. It is a different story that the publishing dynamics have changed drastically in our country. Earlier on, the only writers who made it were either the socialites or people who were already columnists. The rest were conveniently forgotten. Well, I am glad that that is changing. The so-called “Basha” literature is now gaining its ground. It would have been great if that would happen in its original form, however the good thing is that people are becoming aware of such writers and their works.

With this viewpoint, I started reading Makarand Sathe’s, “The Man Who Tried to Remember”. This book is strangely different and quite a rollercoaster read. The story begins when the central character, Achyut Athavaley, an internationally acclaimed writer and thinker, fleets in his memory patterns, and what exactly led to the murder of Bodhni, a fellow inmate of the old-age home, where Achyut is spending his years after retirement. Achyut did kill Bodhni in a fit of temporary memory loss. He is now on a trial.

But this is not what the plot is. The plot is extended by numerous NGOs, politicians and the film industry protesting for Achyut’s life to be saved. The so-called media jamboree begins and that is coupled with Achyut’s thoughts fantastically throughout the book.

I have never come across such modernity (in terms of writing and narration) in an Indian novel earlier, so for me, this book ranks very high in terms of style and structure. What also crossed my mind was the fact that the translation, which is done superbly by Shanta Gokhale, must have been such a task to begin with. The writing wavers from past to present and in flashes.

The book is fast-paced and yet makes you ponder and think about everything that interconnects the plot – memory, emotion, murder, and political campaigning. The happenings of Achyut’s life are presented in a funny manner, keeping the somber tone consistent throughout. Sathe’s writing is immediate and keeping in mind the times we live in, which makes it easier to relate to.

“The Man Who Tried to Remember” is a gem of a book, reflecting today’s time and age. A read that will make you question and shake things up a bit.

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