Tag Archives: reading

Around the World Reading

So, it had been a while since I chanced upon this website:

http://ayearofreadingtheworld.com/

This site is owned and run by Ann Morgan (@annmorgan30 on Twitter), a freelance writer and sub-editor. She took on the project of reading books around the world. A book for each country in the world. So there were 196 books for 196 independent countries.

I read the posts on her site and could not help but take on the same project. She made it easier for me by providing me with a list. The question now is whether to read everything listed by her or read what she picked or create my own list.

I think I will do a bit of all. The list will be perfect. Another reading challenge.

Here are the books I plan to read from the countries starting with “A”. This list is from Afghanistan for now:

Afghanistan: The Original List

• The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (This will be a reread)
• A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini
• Waiting for the Taliban by Anna Badkhen
• The Photographer by Emmanuel Guibert (This will be a reread)
• Behind the Burqa by Batya Swift Yasgur
• The Patience Stone by Atiq Rahimi (This one will be a reread)
• A Thousand Rooms of Dream and Fear by Atiq Rahimi

Afghanistan: My List

• And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini (This will be a reread)
• The Watch by Joydeep Roy-Bhattacharya (This will be a reread)
• The Breadwinner by Deborah Ellis
• The Buddhas of Bamiyan by Llewelyn Morgan
• The Wasted Vigil by Nadeem Aslam (This will be reread)
• The Honey Thief by Najaf Mazari

The challenge will start from today and I am super excited. Starting with “A Thousand Rooms of Dream and Fear” by Atiq Rahimi.

Love among the Bookshelves by Ruskin Bond

Love among the Bookshelves by Ruskin Bond Title: Love among the Bookshelves
Author: Ruskin Bond
Publisher: Penguin Books, Viking
ISBN: 9780670087341
Genre: Non-Fiction
Pages: 200
Source: Publisher
Rating: 3/5

I was eagerly waiting to read this book. And to some extent this book disappointed me. I thought there would be more about books and reading and the experiences of Mr. Bond with his books, but it somehow was not that.

“Love among the Bookshelves” is a well-thought of book and it does talk about Mr. Bond’s adventures in reading, but somehow for me, it fell short in most places. I love books about books and reading. This one just did not do it for me.

The book started off well with Ruskin’s experiences when it came to reading and how it all began, but from there on it was a downhill reading experience for me. Maybe it was the excerpts of every of his favourite writer, or maybe it was the fact that not enough time was spent on reading experiences, per se, but the book did not click with me.

On the other hand, Bond’s style of writing is still the same – simple and sweet and direct to a very large extent, which is what even made me turn the pages. I did not give up. Ruskin Bond’s writing can never make you leave the book mid-way, but like I said, this time, one of his books did not do it for me. I did enjoy the part when he was in London and the books he discovered there.

The recommended reading list at the end of the book is alright. It has some good books in it. All said and done, I would recommend, “Love among the Bookshelves” to ardent Bond fans who must read every book of his.

387 Short Stories : 17th of March 2014 to the 24th of March 2014

Here is a quick look at the short stories read in a week:

Day 98: Story 98: 17th of March 2014: The Diary of a Goose Girl by Kate Douglas Wiggin
Day 99: Story 99: 18th of March 2014: The Dream by Ivan Turgenev
Day 100: Story 100: 19th of March 2014: What Sami Sings with the Birds by Johanna Sypri
Day 101: Story 101: 20th of March 2014: Returning Home by Anthony Trollope
Day 102: Story 102: 21st of March 2014: Ginger and Pickles by Beatrix Potter
Day 103: Story 103: 22nd of March 2014: A Short History of Hairdressing by Julian Barnes
Day 104: Story 104: 23rd of March 2014: The Skating Party by Marina Warner
Day 105: Story 105: 24th of March 2014: The Toys of Peace by Saki

Here’s to more stories. Always.

Read Everywhere

Read

Read while waiting for a friend.
If the friend does not show up, even better. You have more time to read.

Read on a date.
If the person is boring, then you are saved by a book.
If the person is not boring, he or she will understand your need to read.

Read on a coffee break at work.
Ignore the world of office gossip and immerse yourself in the world of words.

Read while waiting for the bus or the train.
Read so much that you get lost and the bus and the train just pass by.

Read like there is no tomorrow. Like perhaps you will not live to read another day.
And if someone asks you why, tell them to leave you alone.

Read when you are tired.
You will for sure be refreshed.

Read at a restaurant.
It is better than checking out random people and looking at a couple fighting at another table.

Read when you want to be comforted.
A book will be with you for a longer period than you imagined.

Read while vacuuming.
Read as you give instructions to someone to do the housework as you get lost and the help just giggles, knowing that nothing can be done about you.

Read while walking. Get lost in the pages.
Do walk on the pavement though. You do not want to get run over.

Read on the bench. Read till the lights come on in the park.
Read till the watchman tells you that it is time to leave.

Read at the end of the day.
Read when you wake up.
Read in-between the day.
Because, perhaps, there is no set time to read.

Read like your life depends on it.
Read like you have all the time in the world.

Read knowing that other people may not approve it.
Read knowing that you do not care about what people think.

At the end of it, for me, it is all about reading.
Reading everywhere, without a care.

S. by J.J. Abrams and Doug Dorst

S. by J.J. Abrams and Doug Dorst Title: S.
Authors: J.J. Abrams and Doug Dorst
Publisher: Canongate Books
ISBN: 9780857864772
Genre: Fantasy, Sci-Fi, Literary, Bibliophilia
Pages: 472
Source: Publisher
Rating: 5/5

S. is an unusual book. Being the die-hard LOST fan that I am, I knew that if J.J. Abrams has co-authored a book (with Doug Dorst) I will for sure love it. It was a given. Sometimes may be you go with the instinct, only to realize that you were right all along. There are also some books, whose synopsis is enough for you to make you know that you have to read this book anyhow and S. happened to be one of them.

S. is a book within a book. It is love for marginalia. It is also bibliophile love. It is love towards authors and their lives and at the same time it is the crazy love for finding out more about an author. S. is all of that and more rolled into one crazy ride of a book.

The book is titled, “Ship of Theseus” by V.M. Straka and you wonder what just happened. Isn’t it meant to be written by Dorst and Abrams? But do not panic. This is the way the book is written. V.M. Straka is a prolific writer and Ship of Theseus is meant to be his last work. While being intellectual, Straka is also a loner. No one has ever seen him. No one knows him either besides his translator and perhaps publisher.

ship-of-theseus-3-Sample

And then there are two readers, Jennifer and Eric, who have never met and communicate only through marginalia in the library book, “Ship of Theseus” speculating about the author, the story of the book, and in all of this, they unravel a lot more about themselves.

Then not to forget is the story of “Ship of Theseus” by Straka, which is the book you will also be reading, about a man lost at sea – who has lost his memory and is with monstrous sailors he does not know and cannot recall. Technically then, there are three stories running parallel and that can either drive you crazy as a reader or keep you wanting more.

The book is brilliantly designed. Ship of Theseus feels and smells like an old library book. There is a sticker on the spine categorizing the book. There are correspondences tumbling out of the book – letters, postcards, maps drawn on coffee house tissue papers, a puzzle, some more postcards and letters that do the rounds, back and forth between Straka and others, and also between Jennifer and Eric.

To begin with, the book might seem difficult to get into, but once you start, you will be hooked to it. The marginalia and reading the text together does take time, but for me that was the only way to do it. I had to read them in tandem, to understand the entire story and context. To me, the book was a rollercoaster ride, with Jen writing in the margin and Eric responding to those. The simple things add to the effect – the different coloured pens used, the writing, the underlining of lines, all of it make you think and relate to what you do as a reader. “S.” is one of those books that need not be begged to be read. An intelligent reader will read it anyway and give it its due.

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